Crawley Physiotherapy and Sports Injury Clinic
Visit our Location
The Pinnacle, Station Way, Crawley, RH10 1JH
Opening Hours
Mon - Sunday: 8AM - 6PM

Sports massage therapy uses a variety of techniques to manipulate your joints and soft tissue to improve your body’s overall health. Massage increases the body’s supply of oxygen and nutrients to your muscles, which help release waste from the muscle tissue. Massage also accelerates your body's own natural ability to heal itself.


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Sports Massage by Physiotherapists

We offer deep soft tissue sports massage from a background of physiotherapy, meaning we have a deep knowledge of anatomy and physiology, and work with this knowledge to achieve the most relaxing and effective experience.

Deep Soft Tissue Sports Massage

Our sports massage offers deep soft tissue application, meaning we apply firm pressure to achieve the best results. This type of massage pressure allows blood flow to circulate to the desired area much quicker, promoting healing and relaxation.

What is sports massage?

Sports Therapy UK defines sports massage as:

...a form of massage involving the manipulation of soft tissue to benefit a person engaged in regular physical activity”.

It differs from a regular massage in the sense that it is targeting specific muscles that are used in your specific or desired exercise/sporting activity.

Therefore, sports massage does include common massage techniques however the treatment is much more tailored and specific to your personal needs, helping you return to the exercise or sport you love most.

 

How does it help?

Sports massage involves identifying areas of muscle tightness and muscular imbalances or abnormalities that could potentially lead to injury, and proceeds by utilising massage techniques to release the muscle tightness or imbalances, resulting in less pain, increased range of movement and improved performance in your given sport.

Science of Sports assessed the available scientific research on the effects of sports massage and found:

“Massage may improve skin and muscle temperature, localised blood flow, and the release of serotonin, though these effects may be small and short-lived. On the other hand, massage may not affect blood lactate removal or reduce cortisol concentrations.

Massage may reduce passive muscle stiffness and increase joint range of motion. Though there is no evidence regarding its effects on active muscle stiffness.

Massage may increase parasympathetic modulation and decrease neuromuscular excitability.

Massage may reduce the perceptions of pain by promoting serotonin and dopamine concentrations, but realistically its effects on pain are far from understood.

Massage may reduce anxiety and increase the state of relaxation, potentially due to its influence on parasympathetic activity”.

 

Who would benefit from a sports massage?

Anyone who has engaged in sports and feels they have long term or recent tightness/pain in a specific muscle or muscle groups.

Sports massage does involve common massage techniques, so anyone of any age and any background with an annoying ‘niggle’ or muscular discomfort of non-serious nature may benefit significantly.

 

What types of conditions can a sports massage help with?

Sports massages can help to in the rehabilitaiton process of multiple different musculo-skeletal conditions, including (but not limited to):

  • Frozen shoulder
  • Jumper's knee
  • Runner's knee
  • Tennis elbow
  • Ankle sprain
  • Hamstring strain
  • Shin splints
  • Groin pull
  • Achilles tendonitis
  • Tight muscles
  • Muscle 'tweaks' and twinges

 

Will it hurt?

At Tavistock Clinic, we get the best results we do from utilising sufficient pressure during out sports massage treatments - therefore it is normal to feel a bit sore at times, especially on the tender spots!

That being said, at no point should if every feel unbearable or significnatly painful. Of course, we as therapists can't feel what you are feeling, so we will ensure during our session that you are aware of the importance of letting us know if it ever does get to this point and we will also remind you regularly to let us know if it becomes a bit too much.

 

How many appointments might I need?

We usually see our sports massage client’s once per month on a regular basis. However there is no required or ‘normal’ number of sessions you will need.

This is because sports massage is usually taken as a form of ‘maintenance’ wellbeing service, focusing on maintaining good muscular condition for a given sport.

We suggest therefore it’s taken as an investment in one’s health for the long term, helping you enjoy your chosen sport for many years to come.

 

How much does it cost to have a sports massage at Tavistock Clinic?

Please enquire about cost and availability by clicking here.

 

How do I book a sports massage?

You can ask any further questions you may have and book your appointment by calling 0740072592.

 

Who are your therapists and who will perform the massage?

At Tavistock Clinic we are proud that the sports massage service in our Crawley clinic is offered by qualified and registered Physiotherapists, who have an extensive knowledge of the anatomy and function of the body.

 

Will I need a separate consultation meeting before my first massage appointment?

No. When you attend your first sports massage appointment, a short medical history will be taken, and details of your goals and requirements are confirmed. Then you will receive a sports massage for the duration requested (multiple packages available).

 

Are there any reasons I could not have a massage?

SportsInjuryClinic.net writes extensively about contraindications (reasons you should not have) a massage. If you have any of the following conditions we would recommend to wait until you have recovered from the condition before booking in for a sports massage with us:

  • Open wounds
  • Muscle ruptures
  • Tendon ruptures
  • Muscle and tendon partial tears
  • Contusions - Bleeding within muslcles from an impact injury
  • Burns, chillblains or broken bones
  • Periostitis - Inflammation of the sheath (surrounding area) or bone.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis and gout
  • Bursitis - Inflammation of a bursa
  • Myositis ossificans - Bone growth resulting from muscle rupstures
  • Infections of the skin and soft tissue
  • Thrombosis - A very serious form of blood clot in a vein
  • Tumours
  • Anything else you are unsure about!

Other than these specific cases, you should be entirely safe to have a sports massage. This will ofcourse be assessed in detail on the day you attend for your session

If you have any further questions feel free to contact us and we’ll be happy to help.